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FAQ

Q.  I won an SBIR Phase I in 2010 and received an extension in 2011.  Can I use this as eligibility for the SBIR Phase I Program?
A.  Yes, provided the agency gave you a document with a start date in 2011 or 2012.

Q.  Same as above for Phase II program.
A.  Same as above.

Q.  I won a Phase I B in 2011.  Does that count towards eligibility for the Phase I SBIR state matching grant?
A.  Yes, provided the agency gave you a document with a start date in 2011 or 2012.

Q.  Same as above for Phase II B program.
A.  Same as above.

Q.  What exactly are you looking for in the award documentation that I need to upload?
A.  We need to make sure that your award is within our parameters.  It must show that the award is a Phase I SBIR.  An R&D award is not enough.  It must show that the start date is within 2011 and 2012.  Some of the documentation we are receiving is contract data from agencies that does not show the award was an SBIR.  Please show us your award letter or other documentation that shows the award is an SBIR Phase I.

Q.  Can I use a loan that was converted to an equity investment to qualify for my loan match for a Phase II loan?
A.  Yes, so long as it's in the application's current time frame.

 Q.  Can I use "in kind" services for my match?
A.  No.

 Q.  We will be applying for a Phase I State Matching Grant.  The application instructions require a Commercialization Plan from the Phase I grant application.  We were not required to submit a Commercialization Plan with our NIH Phase I application.   Can you tell me what is needed in the Commercialization Plan for the State Matching Grant application? 
A.  Provide us with a short summary explaining how you plan to move forward with your commercialization. 

Q.  Can I show G&A in my Phase I budget?
A.  No, we expect to see receipts for directly incurred expenses.

Q. Can I show a profit in my Phase I budget?
A. No, we expect to see receipts for directly incurred expenses.

Q.  Is the contract with the state?
A.  No, it's with Connecticut Innovations, a quasi-public authority.

Q.  Would UConn's IP clinic qualify as working with a Connecticut research university?
A.  Yes, so long as there is payment involved you can use the funding to pay for this type of service.  If they provide free services -- then, No.

Q.  Is there a Connecticut residence requirement?
A.  Yes, for two years after the final award payment is made -- the winning company's principal place of business must reamin in Connecticut.